Tag Archives: nose whistle

Not much success with CBT, triggers evolving again

Since I last updated my blog several months ago, significant changes have occurred with my trigger noises, and I haven’t had much luck with cognitive behavioral therapy.

As I’ve written about in the past, I did not think CBT would every be a cure for misophonia, but I was willing to try it if it would help me cope with some of my negative feelings associated with hearing trigger sounds.

I tried the classic CBT techniques. I exposed myself to trigger noises and tried to calm myself with breathing or relaxation techniques to try to bring down my negative emotions while experiencing the trigger sound. I’ve used CBT with certain phobias, and had some pretty good success, but I didn’t have that same success when using it for misophonia. If someone else has, I’d love to hear about any particular techniques that were useful.

Relaxation and breathing techniques, however, did appear helpful at calming me down after I was able to escape the sound that was causing my negative emotions. Without using relaxation techniques, I can find that too much exposure to a trigger noise can send me into an awful mood for minutes after getting away from the sound. Does that happen to anyone else? It’s like I still hear the sound in my head even though the sound has stopped, and I dwell on it.

Relaxation techniques such as deep-belly breathing have helped me not dwell on those trigger noises after they’ve passed. That’s something at least.

Another challenge I faced while trying to use CBT was that I got passed around to two different therapists, and neither of them had heard of misophonia. It takes a while to educate a therapist about misophonia, and it was particularly frustrating to go through that process multiple times. I’m no longer seeing a therapist regularly.

The newest trigger that’s been impacting my life is the nose whistle. In particular, the whistle my partner’s nose makes while my partner is sleeping. I end up wearing earplugs to sleep every night, in addition to wearing them often while at work if a coworker is eating or chewing gum (which happens frequently). I get occasional ear pain and worry that wearing ear plugs all the time could lead to an ear infection, but it’s still the best way to keep myself sane and functioning.

That’s all the progress (or lack thereof) to report for now. Some visitors to the site asked for an update. As a side note, I wanted to say that I never expected this many people to find my blog and find value in it. I’m happy that this is one of the sites people go to when realizing they have misophonia, a condition so many others have. Thanks for reading, and please make sure to visit other resources to help you learn more about this condition we share.