Tag Archives: Zengar

Serious misgivings after trying Neurofeedback for my Misophonia

After many attempts at trying to curb my Misophonia, I decided to try my most expensive option yet: neurofeedback.

BrainWaveHealthIllustI’m apprehensive to even write about neurofeedback because I don’t want this post to seem like an endorsement of the method. But basically, the neuro process works like this: you relax in a chair with a few electronic sensors attached to your ears and scalp; the sensors read your brain waves as you listen to music and watch a light display on a computer screen; the music and light display are interrupted ever-so-slightly when the sensors detect that your brain is deviating from a happy and healthy state; these slight interruptions – or ‘feedback’ – are believed by some to rewire your brain to achieve some level of normalcy.

I’ve read about a handful of people online who say the method has cured their Misophonia or has at least reduced their symptoms.

There are a number of computer programs out there that provide this service. I tried Zengar’s Neuroptimal after the creator of that particular program, Val Brown, spoke at the first Misophonia conference in Portland a couple of years ago. There also was a man at the conference who said that after trying neuro, his Misophonia completely vanished. One couple there said they were about to purchase their own neurofeedback machine to use whenever they wanted, at a cost of about $10,000.

Neuroptimal is a one-size-fits-all approach to neurofeedback. It claims to help with a whole host of problems, including ADHD, autism, Alzheimers disease and post-traumatic stress disorder. It claims to help you sleep better and to increase your ability focus at the office.

I found someone in my area with a Neuroptimal machine and met her for a consultation. She administered neuro in an office-like setting; it felt like I was going to see a therapist and there was even a reception desk. My practitioner told me she had treated one other person with Misophonia, and that Neuroptimal reduced that person’s Misophonia triggers. I was asked to commit up-front to 24 sessions at $75 each – an $1,800 investment. I agreed.

I started weekly sessions and hoped for an improvement, but ultimately I saw none.

My practitioner, who does not have Misophonia, seemed to truly believe in the power of neuro, almost to the point that it seemed to cloud her judgement when I told her that I wasn’t seeing any improvements. She would ask me questions such as, “Is there anything at all that you’re noticing that’s different? Are you sleeping better? Are you able to focus better at work? Are your relationships better?”

Was she actually encouraging me to seek out a placebo effect? It seemed unscientific and unprofessional. She also told me that it was OK if I fell asleep during my neuro sessions and that it would be just as effective either way.

“Wow… It’s working,” she’d say after pointing to the analytics spit out by the neuro program following a session. “Stuff’s moving.” That was her way of telling me my brain was creating new pathways; it was being rewired to find a different response to triggers. Despite her take on what was happening to my brain, my Misophonia remained the same. I declined further neuro sessions.

ar128231040041311My provider said I should see some changes during those 24 sessions. In the rare endorsements I’ve read online about using neuro to treat Misophonia, people have said it can take many, many more sessions than 24 to start seeing an improvement. I simply didn’t have the financial means to continue, nor the ability to suspend my disbelief any longer.

If you have unlimited time and money, or if there’s a practitioner out there willing to treat you for free, I suppose you could give it a whirl. In that case, I also would suggest trying a neuro program that is more targeted than the one-size-fits-all approach. It would be wonderful to be able to hear that the method is working for more than just a handful of people with Misophonia.

If money is tight, I would strongly urge you not to try neurofeedback until there is insurmountable evidence that this method does help people with Misophonia. It’s simply too expensive, and having a practitioner tell you that you probably just need more sessions before you see improvements? It leaves too much room for the possibility that you’ll be taken advantage of.

If you disagree with me, or if you’ve come across any peer-reviewed studies or scholarly articles that suggest neurofeedback provides more than a placebo effect for any disease or disorder, could you let me know in the comments section?

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